When it comes to dieting to lose body fat, there’s no substitute for hard work. Believe me; I really wish this were not the case. Unfortunately, however, you must burn more calories than you ingest every day to lose that body fat and get lean.

Low-fat diets, high-fat, carefully watching your fat intake, or paying close attention to the glycemic index in your foods—it doesn’t matter. When the day is done, you must burn more calories than you eat. It doesn’t even matter if all the food you eat is healthy, non-junk food, or “clean,” it’s total must be lower than your maintenance level. Don’t misunderstand me; proper macronutrient construction is essential to maintaining and building muscle while losing fat. But at the end of the day, calories consumed must be less than calories burned.

As I always say, “There s a price-tag on everything.” If you’ve accumulated some body fat and desperately want to get rid of it, you are going to have to pay the price. The price may be spending more time sweating on a treadmill, feeling hungry on occasion, or both. Whatever method you choose, there will be some pain involved. I would be lying to you if I told you any differently.

See Also:
How should I use VP2 if I want to lose body fat?

Anyone who tells you differently is just flat-out lying you! I firmly believe it is everyone’s desire to discover some painless alternative that we mistakenly believe is “somewhere out there” which prevents us from dieting the way we must to accomplish our goal of losing body fat.

There are several ways to burn more calories than you eat. You can add more cardiovascular work to your training regimen, simply eat less food throughout the day, or even do a combination of more cardiovascular training and eating less food.

So, let’s quit looking for a magic solution when comes to losing body fat and get to work! Eat right, train hard, train heavy, and sweat!

You Will Also Like . . .

Question?
Your question was successfully sent! It will be answered shortly.



7 + 1 =

What is the secret to getting and staying lean?

by Paul Delia time to read: 2 min